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What Age To Get Prostate Screening

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Do All Men Who Are Treated For Prostate Cancer Lose Sexual And Urinary Function

At What Age and How Often Should You Get Your Prostate Screened?

Its definitely not true that all men are incontinent and impotent after treatment for prostate cancer. Urinary incontinence is usually temporary.;

There can be a sexual impact for guys who have normal function. If the cancer is near their nerve bundle, theyre going to have a decrease in sexual function. If its not, and we can do bilateral nerve sparing surgery, studies show 70 percent can get back their normal sexual function. It all depends on where the cancer is. But the truth is that we cant predict very well who will be the 30 percent who will haveor still haveED; some already do have ED because of age, diabetes, hypertension or renal failure.

What Is A Prostate Cancer Screening Like

A prostate cancer screening can be conducted in one of two ways. The first, a PSA test, is a simple blood draw. The second is a brief rectal exam that takes less than 30 seconds to perform.

For a screening, if a patient comes and asks for a prostate cancer screening, it begins with a blood test, said Ehdaie. Its a small vial of blood, and then a medical history and physical examination. In the physical examination there will be a digital rectal examination in which the physicians finger is inserted into the rectum to feel the prostate.

An Abnormal Psa Test: What Comes Next

If your PSA score is in the abnormal range, your doctor may recommend yourepeat the PSA test. If your levels are still high, your doctor mightrecommend one of the newer prostate cancer screening tests available today.

These tests can help better assess your risk for prostate cancer anddetermine whether a biopsy is necessary. Only a prostate biopsy candefinitively diagnose prostate cancer.

For individualized recommendations that suit you, ask your doctor about:

  • What age you should start prostate cancer screening
  • New blood, urine and imaging tests that are available
  • Improved biopsy techniques, if applicable

Read Also: What Happens To The Prostate Later In Life

Early Cancer Detection Can Save Lives And Cut Treatment Costs But When Should You Start Having Prostate Exams And Do You Need To Have Them At All

When it comes to screening for prostate cancer, some men may be confused or apprehensive about beginning to get annual exams.

As prostate cancer affects one out of every six men, the American Cancer Society and other leading medical organizations recommend older men discuss having annual prostate cancer screenings with their primary care doctor to help detect the disease early. Early detection of the disease helps cure it in 90 percent of cases.

Generally, it is recommended that men with an average risk of prostate cancer start being screened with a digital rectal exam and PSA blood-level exam when they hit the age of 50. African-American men and men who have a father, brother or son who were diagnosed with prostate cancer when they were younger than 65 are at higher risk and should start screenings at age 40. Men who have had more than one of these close relatives diagnosed before age 65 are at even higher risk.

When Is A Psa Test Needed

PROSTATE CANCER: SYMPTOMS & CAUSES

If you are age 50 to 74, you should discuss the PSA test with your doctor. Ask about the possible risks and benefits.

Men under 50 or over 75 rarely need a PSA test, unless they have a high risk for prostate cancer.

  • You are more likely to get prostate cancer if you have a family history of prostate cancer, especially in a close relative such as a parent or sibling.
  • Your risks are higher if your relative got prostate cancer before age 60 or died from it before age 75. These early cancers are more likely to grow faster.
  • If you have these risks, you may want to ask your doctor about getting the PSA test before age 50.

This report is for you to use when talking with your healthcare provider. It is not a substitute for medical advice and treatment. Use of this report is at your own risk.

04/2014

Recommended Reading: What Happens To The Prostate Later In Life

What Do The Results Mean

PSA levels may be above the baseline for various reasons other than prostate cancer.

Other factors that can raise PSA levels include:

  • older age
  • an enlarged prostate â because of benign prostatic hyperplasia , for example
  • prostatitis, which is inflammation and swelling of the prostate

Also, people with obesity may have lower PSA readings.

In addition, some medications may reduce PSA levels, including:

  • 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, which can help treat BPH
  • aspirin, which some people take regularly as a blood thinner
  • statins, which help manage cholesterol levels
  • thiazide diuretics, a kind of water pill that can help reduce high blood pressure

Some herbal medicines and supplements can also lower PSA levels. Tell the doctor about any medications and supplements before undergoing the test.

High PSA levels alone do not indicate cancer. However, if a DRE also reveals changes, a doctor may recommend a biopsy for a more accurate result.

The PCA3 is another test for prostate cancer that doctors use in some circumstances. Find out more.

Symptoms Of Prostate Cancer

Symptoms of prostate cancer do not usually appear until the prostate is large enough to affect the tube that carries urine from the bladder out of the penis .

When this happens, you may notice things like:

  • an increased need to pee
  • straining while you pee
  • a feeling that your bladder has not fully emptied

These symptoms should not be ignored, but they do not mean you have prostate cancer.

It’s more likely they’re caused by something else, such as prostate enlargement.

Also Check: Does An Enlarged Prostate Affect A Man Sexually

What Is The Psa Test

Prostate-specific antigen, or PSA, is a protein produced by normal, as well as malignant, cells of the prostate gland. The PSA test measures the level of PSA in a mans blood. For this test, a blood sample is sent to a laboratory for analysis. The results are usually reported as nanograms of PSA per milliliter of blood.

The blood level of PSA is often elevated in men with prostate cancer, and the PSA test was originally approved by the US Food and Drug Administration ;in 1986 to monitor the progression of prostate cancer in men who had already been diagnosed with the disease. In 1994,;FDA approved the use of the PSA test in conjunction with a digital rectal exam to test asymptomatic men for prostate cancer. Men who report prostate symptoms often undergo PSA testing to help doctors determine the nature of the problem.

In addition to prostate cancer, a number of benign conditions can cause a mans PSA level to rise. The most frequent benign prostate conditions that cause an elevation in PSA level are prostatitis and benign prostatic hyperplasia ;. There is no evidence that prostatitis or BPH leads to prostate cancer, but it is possible for a man to have one or both of these conditions and to develop prostate cancer as well.

There Are Risks To Getting Prostate Cancer Tests And Treatments

When to Get Tested for Prostate Cancer

If your PSA is not normal, you will probably have a biopsy. The doctor puts a needle through the wall of the rectum and into the prostate to take a few samples. Biopsies can be painful and cause bleeding. Men can get serious infections from biopsies, and they may need hospital care.

Surgery or radiation are the usual treatments for prostate cancer. They can do more harm than good. Treatment can cause serious complications, such as heart attacks, blood clots in the legs or lungs, or even death. In addition, 40 men out of 1,000 will become impotent or incontinent from treatment.

Recommended Reading: Is Viagra Good For Enlarged Prostate

Should I Have A Psa Test

If you have no symptoms of prostate cancer and are thinking about having a PSA test, you should ask your doctor about the risks and benefits.

While some studies suggest PSA reduces mortality on a population basis, the test picks up large numbers of cancers that would have caused no symptoms or harm in the patient. This is known as overdiagnosis. Overdiagnosis of prostate cancer can lead to unnecessary treatments that have side effects such as sexual impotence, urinary incontinence and bowel problems.

It is important to balance the potential benefit of detecting a prostate cancer early against the risk that detection and treatment may not be necessary. Treatment may affect your lifestyle but it may also save your life.;

Make your own decision about whether to be tested after a discussion with your doctor. Ensure you get good quality information to make an informed decision.

Screening tests for breast, bowel and cervical cancer can save lives, but there is still confusion around PSA testing for prostate cancer.;Find more information here.;

Remember, if you have any concerns or questions, please contact your doctor.

Response To Public Comment

A draft version of this recommendation statement was posted for public comment on the USPSTF website from April 11 to May 8, 2017. A number of comments suggested that because men are now living longer, they should be screened beyond 70 years of age. However, the USPSTF considered other evidence in addition to data on life expectancy when recommending against screening in men older than 70 years, including results from large screening trials that did not report a mortality benefit for men older than 70 years and evidence on the increased likelihood of harm from screening, diagnostic evaluation, treatment, overdiagnosis, and overtreatment. Several comments requested a recommendation for younger men and for baseline PSA-based screening in men 40 years and older or 50 years and older. The USPSTF found inadequate evidence that screening younger men or performing baseline PSA-based screening provides benefit.

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: All authors have completed and submitted the ICMJE Form for Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest. Authors followed the policy regarding conflicts of interest described at . All members of the USPSTF receive travel reimbursement and an honorarium for participating in USPSTF meetings.

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What Are The Most Common Prostate Problems

For such a little gland, the prostate seems to cause a lot of concern. Like a troubled, war-torn country, it’s in the news all the time and something always seems to be going wrong there, but you don’t really know where it is or why it’s important.

All men are at risk for prostate problems. That’s because all men have a prostate. Take a look at this overview of prostate problems to assess your risk for trouble with your prostate.

Benign prostatic hyperplasia .BPH, also known as an enlarged prostate, is growth of the prostate gland to an unhealthy size. A man’s chances of having BPH go up with age:

  • Age 31-40: one in 12
  • Age 51-60: about one in two
  • Over age 80: more than eight in 10

However, only about half of men ever have BPH symptoms that need treatment. BPH does not lead to prostate cancer, although both are common in older men.

Prostate Cancer. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men . About one man in six will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime. Let’s keep these numbers in perspective, though. Because prostate cancer is usually slow growing, only about one in 35 men will die of prostate cancer.

Like BPH, the risk for prostate cancer increases with age. About two out of every three men with prostate cancer are over age 65. No one knows exactly what causes prostate cancer, but risk factors associated with it include:

How Often Should Men Have A Prostate Screening

Morningside Medical Practice

A prostate screening is extremely important to have regularly. Because, without them, a mans health is at a high risk of developing prostate cancer. Knowing how often prostate screenings should be had can be helpful to those men who are not sure.

A mans health is just as important to maintain as a womans. But most people are under the assumption that womens health needs more attention. However, that is not true. Men are at risk of developing prostate cancer, and it can become very problematic if not addressed.

Keep reading to find out how often a man should have a prostate screening.

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What Age Does A Man Need To Get A Prostate Exam

Who should get a prostate exam? Men over the age of 50 should have an annual prostate exam, says Dr. Sand. If you have a family history of the disease, the exam can be performed as early as age 40.

  • Do You Really Need an Annual Prostate Exam? |

    At What Age Does A Man Need A Prostate Exam · American Urological Association age guidelines: The AUA does not recommend routine PSA screening for men 70 or older or with a life expectancy of less than 10 to 15 years. Screening may be considered in men ages 55 to 69 with the knowledge that it will prevent about one cancer …

    http://healthcare.utah.edu/the-scope/shows.php

  • Research Suggests Early Prostate Cancer Screening Can Lead To Unnecessary Treatment And Side Effects

    A nurse hovers over 46-year-old Allan Martin, instructing him to make a fist, before drawing blood from his left arm.

    “It’s about time I got checked again. I haven’t had it done for four years,” he told CBC News moments after having blood collected for a prostate-specific antigen test.

    Martin, along with dozens of other men, showed up to get their PSA tested at Calgary’s Prostate Cancer Centre and get a photo with the former professional wrestler Bret Hart just before Valentine’s Day in February.

    Hart, a former professional wrestler, became an advocate for early testing after getting diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2015.

    “If you just get your blood work done, it could save your life,” Hart said,;his World Wrestling Federation championship title belt resting on the table beside him. Hart’s older brother, Smith, died in 2017 months after being diagnosed with Stage 4 prostate cancer.

    Hart said his brother’s dying wish was to encourage more men to get PSA; screening early. The annual Bret Hart Men’s Health Day is aimed at getting men to “take charge of their health.”

    The news release announcing the event stressed;that when caught early, prostate cancer is “very treatable.”

    The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care, in fact, recommends against early screening for prostate cancer, saying the “harms of PSA screening outweigh the benefits.”

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    What Does The Psa Test Involve

    The PSA test involves taking a blood sample and sending it to a laboratory for analysis. The results indicate:

    Normal levels: Most healthy adult males have PSA levels below 4 nanograms per milliliter .

    Borderline levels: PSA levels of 4â10 ng/ml are borderline. There is a 1 in 4 chance that cancer is present.

    High levels: If PSA levels are over 10 ng/ml, there is a 50% chance that the person has prostate cancer. The specialist will likely recommend more testing, including a prostate biopsy.

    It is important to note that PSA levels can naturally vary from person to person. A person with high levels may not have prostate cancer. On the other hand, about 15% of people who test positive for prostate cancer after a biopsy have PSA levels below 4 ng/ml.

    Prostate cancer is not the only cause of high PSA levels. Find out more about the other causes here.

    What Do You Say To Patients Diagnosed With Prostate Cancer

    When should Men get Screenings for Prostate Cancer?

    Something I say to my patients a lot is that, in treating prostate cancer, we end up trying to extend your;quantity;of life at the cost of your;quality;of life. And so, at some point, if the quantity is extended a lot, and we can minimize the effect on quality, that makes sense, but the equation is different for every man. How much decrease in quality of life are you willing to accept if were going to extend your life?

    Realistically, a lot of guys who are 70 dont have any sexual function;anyway, so thats not a huge loss for them. As men get older theres definitely an increased chance of having erectile dysfunction ; the guys who have sexual function over 70 are very keen on preserving it. Even for the guys who dont have good sexual function, who are on Viagra, for them its often even more important to preserve what sexual function they have.

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    Screening For Prostate Cancer In Men With A Family History

    Burden

    The introduction of PSA-based screening for prostate cancer has substantially altered the epidemiologic data for prostate cancer, greatly increasing the number of men with a diagnosis of prostate cancer and thus also the number of men with a father, brother, or son with a history of prostate cancer.

    Available Evidence

    It is generally accepted that men with a family history of prostate cancer are more likely to develop prostate cancer. A study of twins in Scandinavia estimated that genetic factors may account for up to 42% of prostate cancer risk.18 An analysis from the Finnish site of the ERSPC trial concluded that men with at least 1 first-degree relative with prostate cancer were 30% more likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer than men without a family history.19 Men with 3 first-degree relatives with prostate cancer or 2 close relatives on the same side of the family with prostate cancer diagnosed before age 55 years may have an inheritable form of prostate cancer associated with genetic changes passed down from one generation to the next. This type of prostate cancer is thought to account for less than 10% of all prostate cancer cases.20

    The USPSTF searched for evidence about the potential benefits and harms of PSA-based screening for prostate cancer in men with a family history of prostate cancer.

    Potential Benefits

    Potential Harms

    Advising Men With a Family History of Prostate Cancer

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